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TOPIC: Embalming

Re:Embalming 09 Aug 2010 08:46 #358

  • northstar73
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tumbleweed,

I am a proponent of the heart tap method being used during embalming, but I am not an exclusive user of it nor is it my first choice of vascular drainage. Quite the contrary, the problems created by improperly performing this procedure can complicate the embalming process greatly. I prefer to use an intermittent method with a drain tube at the site of the primary arterial injection. The heart tap is utilized only when I am fully committed to proceeding with multiple injection sites for areas lacking sufficient distribution and diffusion if the heart tap does not work.

I trust I left this specific enough to be of help while being general enough that it does not require any moderator editing for content...

N'Star73
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Re: Embalming 15 Sep 2011 14:22 #551

The reason most, not all, cemeteries require embalming in order to be entombed in a mausoleum is because of public safety. Over time the body will decompose and those fluids can, and will, leak from the mausoleum tomb. If it's an indoor mausoleum an odor can last for months.

Embalming may not ultimately stop all leaking, but it will give it a chance to slow down and dry up before running out of the tomb. Also, by requiring embalming, any fluids that happen to spill would be free of (most) diseases in infections. The primary purpose of embalming is disinfection. Secondary to disinfection is preservation.
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Re: Embalming 30 Nov 2011 20:08 #671

kdazet wrote:
Bear with me. This is my first time on the forum. I just recently purchased a mauseleum crypt in Utah for myself and my wife, and was told that it was a "requirement" that I be embalmed. I have been reading that embalming is normally not required except in one or two states(I don't think Utah is one of them ) and would rather avoid it if possible, maybe for environmental reasons. Is this a case of someone trying to sell me a service that I don't really need, or is this maybe because I will be in an above ground structure?

can anyone shed some light on this issue?

It's probably to keep the decomposition fluids from running out of the casket and through the crypt front. This is a problem with above ground crypts.

A lot of cemeteries slightly prop the lid open on the casket to help the remains dry out or "mummify" to prevent the fluid leaking problems. When the casket lid is propped open (this is done especially with "sealer" caskets) the embalming and the dry climate (in Utah for sure) helps slow down decomposition, and thus the chance of fluid running out is decreased. If the casket is sealed, there is more chance for the remains to decay into fluid and if the casket has a bad weld or is wood and becomes unjointed, fluid can leak out down the crypt front, which may draw flies and have an unsightly appearance.

Mausoleum crypts are vented to handle the odors from the caskets that are propped slighlty open. Cemeterians fear a fluid problem more than the smell, as the crypt vents conduct the smell to the top of the mausoleum and out into the air above the public's heads, and they don't smell the odors that way.
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Re: Embalming 30 Nov 2011 21:58 #676

  • northstar73
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This is a perfect example of the difference between a state law and a company policy. Even though the state may not require embalming, it may be a requirement of this particular cemetery in order to be entombed there. This is no different than states not requiring by law an outer container for the casket in a ground burial but many cemeteries by policy do require them. Unfortunately, if it is the policy of the mausoleum owner to have a body embalmed before being placed in a crypt, there is not much you can do about it. You may wish to try telling them that embalming is against your religion and what options can they offer? For example, many in the Jewish faith are not typically embalmed, and many service providers have found ways to still serve the family while honoring that tradition.

As for those caskets and the liquid problems discussed, many mausoleums now require caskets be placed in a plastic tray that is lined with highly absorbant compounds. That way, if any leakage is present and liquid exits the casket, the tray and compound retain the fluid until it dries, keeping it from appearing outside the crypt where it can be adversely affect the public.

In the end, the requirements for entombments, inurnments, and burials are primarily set by the cemetery administration. Rarely does state law infringe on these requirements or demand more than the cemetery does by policy. If in doubt, ask the cemetery staff if the requirement is a legal requirement or cemetery policy. If they are being truthful, you will rarely find them reply that it is law.

I hope this helps and please feel free to post again if we can offer more insight!
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