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TOPIC: Going Green

Going Green 28 Jul 2010 09:58 #347

Since the entire nation is "going green". I was wondering if anyone could share anything they have done in their funeral homes to "go green".

I am in the middle of researching this topic for a new online course. Any input would be appreciated.

Jody...
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Re:Going Green 01 Aug 2010 13:24 #351

  • northstar73
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Hmm....going green... what could be more green than putting a body back into the ground and not using fossil fuels to cremate it? ;)

Okay, couple of things that I can see where people and processes are going "green".

First involves the Dodge Company, maker of a wide line of embalming chemicals and funeral home sundries and supplies. They have created a new embalming fluid product that contains no EPA regulated chemicals.

Second, I am seeing more and more green cemeteries that allow burials without outer burial containers (vaults are an example of these). They allow the body or casket to be directly buried in the ground so as to facilitate the process of going back to the earth.

Third, many casket companies have gone from solid wood plank construction of caskets to offering a veneered product that looks the same. I know, how is that green? Simply put, more of each harvested tree can be used in the manufacturing process of veneer products than can be used in plank construction. In fact, almost the whole tree is used in veneer construction! (they still take off the leaves...)

There are a number of other ways a funeral home can go green, but they tend to me more in general ways that everyone can participate... energy saving lighting fixtures, programmable thermostats, etc. I am, however, curious to see just what a Prius hearse would look like... :woohoo:

-N'Star73
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Re:Going Green 01 Aug 2010 16:14 #352

This is a lot of great information. Have you ever used the new Dodge Company embalming fluid? If so do you have any feedback on the pros and cons compared to the regular embalming fluid.

Thanks!

Jody...
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Re:Going Green 02 Aug 2010 01:54 #353

  • tumbleweed
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I'm just reentering the profession after a nine year sabatcal. The closest I've come to using anything " green " is Champions formaldehyde free glutraldehyde based fluids. I'm looking forward to using Dodge's 'enviromentally friendly"products.
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Re:Going Green 05 Aug 2010 07:01 #354

  • northstar73
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I have not used the new embalming product from Dodge, "Freedom Art" that is supposed to be -aldehyde free... I dare not say formaldehyde free since glutaraldehyde has been around for quite some time and is considered "formaldehyde free". I am not a proponent of "formaldehyde free" equalling "going green", and I do not believe the point of their new formaldehyde free product was to specifically "go green". I believe the point was to create an embalming solution that was safer for embalmers to work with and bypassed many of the HAZMAT requirements of traditional fluids (both formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde). With that said, I believe they found a new marketing angle in the green direction and in letting people realize that embalming can be "temporary" and not long term as they see the traditional embalming procedure. What I mean by that is most people associate traditional embalming with something akin to what was done by ancient egyptians...they see it as something of a permanent preservation. This new product is marketed as a temporary preservation allowing for viewing and services but still allowing the body to return to the elements sooner. From that angle, I can see how "green" may be claimed if you see return of the body to natural elements as green. Now, they can market as both safer AND greener. It will be interesting to see how it does in sales as I understand it is about twice the cost per body to embalm with than traditional fluids given an average case.
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Re:Going Green and disinterment 08 Aug 2010 13:45 #357

  • tumbleweed
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I'm not a big proponent of green anything. But consider this : a shrouded body or one buried in an"alternitive contanier" is to be disinterd, say in 2012, for medical-legal identification. --- You can see where I'm going with this. --- Has your respective states Deptartments of Public Health enacted any laws, rules or codes regarding the recovery of the remains?

Respectively submitted
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