BLOG-The Daily Dirge

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FCA recognizes that the dissemination of individual experiences, the reporting of public information, and linking to other sites can help further our mission of educating the public on their funeral rights and options. However, FCA's limited resources and the nature of the Internet make it impossible to verify the content of personal experiences that are supplied by others or to verify the content of linked sites. FCA accepts no responsibility for these. Comments on the contents of personal reports and linked websites should be directed to the author(s).



Funeral Procession: Public Nuisance or Sacred Tradition?

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Questioning the necessity or safety of a time-honored tradition is often met with ire. Josh Slocum addresses the elephant on the road: the funeral procession. Read all about it at The Order Of The Good Death.

Last Updated ( Friday, 03 October 2014 12:11 )
 

Co-op funeral providers are finding themselves at home in Canada

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The Co-op Funeral movement in Canada is taking off. Modest spending and an aversion to the aggressive sales tactics of some other for-profit funeral homes are causing many to turn to co-op funeral providers for their final arrangements. Read about it here.

 

CBS: "Mortician wants to start a death revolution"

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Recent FCA Biennial Conference speaker, author, YouTube star, and mortician, Caitlin Doughty, is interviewed by CBS. Her bizarre and hilarious YouTube video series about death's weirder moments takes a backseat here to a serious discussion about how the American conversation on death and dying is shifting. Read it here.

Click here to view her delightful videos and find answers to all the burning questions about death and corpses you never thought to ask!

 

Funeral trade self-interest trumps consumer choice in South Carolina

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Funeral trade protectionism in South Carolina is stifling competition in casket sales. FCA of South Carolina's president, Gere Fulton, writes about it here.

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 27 August 2014 10:43 )
 

From corpse to compost

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It might take a while for this to catch on with the general public, but for the increasing number of individuals with the desire to limit their carbon footprint, the Urban Death Project presents a unique alternative to modern burial practices, and one that would allow cities with limited cemetery space another option for body disposition. 

 

Read about it here at Fast Company.

 


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