News and Blogs

"You are a new man now, Daddy"

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OK to Die Blog
Friday, 27 July 2012

One family's remarkable peace with choosing a natural death over surgery for a debilitated loved one.

Mr. Omer had once held a position of social prominence, a moral influence on the lives of individuals and communities; until one year ago. A construction accident changed everything. He suffered injuries that left him in control of only one side of his body and his mind functioning as a 5 year old child.

Most recently, he had resided in an extended rehabilitation nursing facility, until yesterday.

When the nurse tried to arouse him from an unusually long nap, she could not. Upon orders from the facility’s doctor, he was sent for a Cat Scan of his head and then rushed to my care in the Emergency Department.

Mr. Omer arrived to bed 25 and his Cat Scan report was placed in my hand, "Large acute subdural hematoma with midline shift and… herniation.

Read the full article at OK to Die Blog

 

Even for the Dead, a Struggle to Find Space in Hong Kong

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The New York Times
Published: October 25, 2012

HONG KONG — A small architecture firm in Hong Kong has come up with an unusual proposal for what to do about the worsening shortage of cemetery space in a crowded and expensive city: Build one that can float.

The structure conceived by the company, Bread Studio, could hold hundreds of thousands of the boxlike niches that are the final resting places for most people in Hong Kong nowadays.

Read the full article in The New York Times

Thanks to the DeathCare Discussion List for alerting us to this article.

 

Friday Funeral Film: Places in the Heart

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The Family Plot Blog
October 26, 2012

I’m starting a series looking at funeral films every Friday! Get the low down on movies that have lessons on life, death and funeral planning. You’ll also be able to see these articles in the Funeral Films section at www.AGoodGoodbye.com.

Places in the Heart (1984-PG) stars Sally Field in her Oscar Award-winning performance as a widow in a Depression-era small town who has to learn how to make a living after her husband, the local sheriff, is shot dead. As a funeral film, it illustrates how families used to wash and dress the bodies of their dead at home. It also vividly shows why life insurance exists to help families after the breadwinner dies.

Read the full article and see video at The Family Plot Blog

 

Wisconsin: borrowing from the NPS playbook

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Death Care Law Blog
October 25 2012

Wisconsin Funeral Directors Association's Master Trust

Recent document disclosures are reflecting that several factors contributed to the WFDA’s master trust deficiency (and the appointment of a receiver). Certain of those factors relate to the fees paid to fund managers and the association’s sponsorship charges. Those factors are relevant to other association master trusts and we will explore them in subsequent posts. However the ‘straw’ that broke this camel’s back came straight from the National Prearranged Services’ playbook.

Read the full article at Death Care Law Blog

 

More people choose 'green' funerals

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Minnesota Public Radio
October 24, 2012

 ST. PAUL, Minn. — As environmental consciousness has grown in the country, some people like Theresa Purcell have questioned the practice of pumping dead bodies full of chemicals before they're buried in thick, concrete vaults in the ground.

"People are unfamiliar with the embalming process. People just hear that if you're going to be buried, you need a concrete vault but don't actually question the reasons behind that," said Purcell, who runs the Full Circle Project, which advocates for natural burials. "In the grand scheme of things, it's a huge waste of resources."

Read the full article at Minnesota Public Radio

Thanks to ConnectingDirectors for alerting us to this article.

 


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