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Home Funerals, What are they?

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Confessions of a Funeral Director
February 20, 2013

It’s strange how professional practices can reverse themselves.

Traditionally, in America, funerals have been held in the “parlour” of the deceased’s home.  During the beginning decades of the twentieth century, the funeral business became more industrialized and funerals were moved to what we now call “Funeral Homes”, or “Funeral parlour.”  Recently, however, there seems to be an interesting trending back toward “home funerals.”

Read the full article at Confessions of a Funeral Director

 

Preparing for Your Own Death

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OK to Die Blog

We all die, whether expectedly or not. When we prepare for our own death in advance, we are able to relieve the decision-making burden on those whom we love and create the opportunity for a peace-filled end of life. Do not miss this opportunity. Start your checklist today.

View, save, and/or print the checklist at OK to Die Blog

RELATED LINKS

Making an end-of life healthcare plan. (Video 4:37)

Family member testimonial (Video 0:57)

 

A guide for funeral planning

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Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS)
July 25, 2011

EDITOR'S NOTE: General information should be applicable to most states.

No one likes to think about death, let alone plan for it. In many families, discussing one's mortality is an extremely uncomfortable topic. But it is a topic that should be discussed and planned for well in advance.

By planning your funeral, you relieve your family of having to make important financial decisions during a period of great stress and grief — a time when people aren't thinking very clearly and may not know what to do because you never made your wishes known.

Read the full article at Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS)

 

What it's Like to Have a Home Funeral

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The Daily Beast
Feb 5, 2013

Preparing a body for burial is a ritual that is both ageless and tribal. Here’s what it’s like.

This is the first time I am so close. There is a body bag on the table, waiting to be opened. Our best friends’ 22-year-old son’s body is inside. His mother and father are across from me, brothers beside, with several women gathered to form the circle around the table. These women will become my sisters in the next five hours, as we prepare the body together.

They are Heather, the home-funeral advocate who had helped the family arrange for the body to come home instead of the funeral parlor; Betty, a Rolfer and powerful healer and longtime caregiver of the family; Julie, a yoga teacher, friend of the mother and Joan, a lifelong family friend who had also lovingly assisted at this boy’s birth. It was Jane, the boy’s mother, who had gotten the call in the middle of the night that their son Wes had been in a bad car accident. She and her husband John had rushed to the hospital to be greeted with the words, “Your son is deceased.”

Read the full article at The Daily Beast

Thanks to The Good Funeral Guide Blog for alerting us to this article.

 

Prepaid funeral plans can be a R.I.P.-off

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Chicago Tribune
January 20, 2013

By Eleanor Laise, Kiplinger Personal Finance, Premium Health News Service

Tom Waggener remembers how pleased his parents were when they told him 15 years ago that they'd prepaid for their own funerals.

"It was so satisfying to them" to think that their children were relieved of the burden, says Waggener, 65, a retired state employee who lives near Taylorsville, Miss.

But after Waggener's mother died in 2006, the funeral home gave his family a bill for more than $10,000. It attributed the extra cost to a special order for the casket she had chosen, which was no longer in stock.

"It was an unpleasant business," Waggener says. "I really don't think prepaid funerals are a good idea."

Read the full article in  the Chicago Tribune

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 30 January 2013 20:48 )
 


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