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An Interview with Joe Sehee (Part One)

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SevenPonds Blog
July 23, 2011

The Green Burial Council founder talks standards, sustainability, and the future

Joe Sehee comes from a background of social justice as a Jesuit minister while his wife, Juliette Sehee, worked as an advocate for the environment. About a decade ago, they decided to open a retreat for the grieving, to inspire spiritual healing through nature — this idea ultimately led to the foundation of the Green Burial Council in 2005.

Read the full article at SevenPonds Blog

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An Interview with Joe Sehee (Part Two)

Last Updated ( Saturday, 30 July 2011 06:55 )
 

Poems for Funerals

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Poets.org

The elegy--the traditional poem for mourning--began in ancient Greece as a sad song lamenting love and death, often accompanied by a flute and written in a specific meter. The form, however, moved away from its fixed metrical roots when it was adopted by Renaissance poets such as Ben Jonson, Alexander Pope, and John Donne. These writers made a distinction between a proper elegy--which expresses sorrow and a search for consolation--and "elegiac" poetry that meditates on loss, grief, death, and mortality in a variety of verse forms, such as the ode, epitaph, and eulogy. For example, Donne famously confronted death when he wrote the elegiac:

Death, be not proud though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those, whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

Shakespeare, of course, wrote a great deal about "what dreams may come when we have shuffled off this mortal coil," and at about the same time John Milton wrote his famous "Lycidas," which appeared in a collection of elegies commemorating the death of a Cambridge collegemate. William Wordsworth wrote poems in the elegiac mode, as did Lord Alfred Tennyson, Walt Whitman, William Butler Yeats, and Thomas Hardy in the nineteenth century. The form was adopted and transformed again in the twentieth century by poets such as W. H. Auden, Dylan Thomas, Wallace Stevens, Robert Lowell, and Allen Ginsberg, who wrote the famous elegy for his mother "Kaddish," which begins .....

Read the full article at Poets.org

Last Updated ( Sunday, 24 July 2011 10:56 )
 

Louisiana Monks Win Casket Case

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Institute for Justice
Web Release: July 21, 2011

Federal Court Protects Economic Liberty by Ruling that Casket Monopoly is Unconstitutional.

A federal court today ruled that Louisiana’s government-imposed monopoly on casket sales in the state is unconstitutional, closing the lid on the economic protection scheme and resurrecting an opportunity for local monks to provide for themselves by creating and selling their handmade caskets.

Read the full article at the Institute for Justice

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Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law - U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Louisiana, New Orleans, 07/21/2011

Louisiana goes after monastery for selling coffins; monks sue (Posted 08/12/2010 - Updated 07/23/2011)

Last Updated ( Monday, 25 July 2011 21:07 )
 

How 38 Monks Took on the Funeral Cartel and Won

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How 38 Monks Took on the Funeral Cartel and Won

The Atlantic
Jul 22 201

Their victory in federal court means they can sell caskets without a license -- and has implications for entrepreneurs all over the United States.

Read the full article at The Atlantic

Thanks to the Funeral Ethics Organization for altering us to this article.

RELATED LINKS

Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law - U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Louisiana, New Orleans, 07/21/2011

Louisiana goes after monastery for selling coffins; monks sue (Posted 08/12/2010 - Updated 07/23/2011)

Last Updated ( Monday, 25 July 2011 21:08 )
 

"The eagle couldn't have picked a better person"

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Star Tribune
Minneapolis MN
June 25, 2011

Frank Glick took this photo [of a bald eagle perched on a tombstone] at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. When he recorded the shot, he never could have guessed how much it was going to mean to the widow of the World War II veteran buried there.

Read the full article at the Star Tribune

Thanks to ConnectingDirectors.com for altering us to this article.

Last Updated ( Friday, 22 July 2011 21:13 )
 


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